What We Can Learn About Technology from a Super Bowl Commercial

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “What We Can Learn About Technology from a Super Bowl Commercial”, In Cyber Defense, 8 Feb. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/technology-super-bowl-commercial/

By James Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for
 In Cyber Defense

During the recent Super Bowl, Hyundai Motor America aired an emotional commercial that showed support for our military. It also showed how technology can be used to keep families connected across the world. Many people do not realize there are more than 150,000 U.S. military service members deployed to over 150 countries.

Technology Evolution Brings Military Families Closer

For decades, military communications with family members in the U.S. was through letters, which took a couple of weeks to reach their destination. In the 1980s, communications greatly improved with the placement of dedicated phone booths on overseas military posts for service members to call their families in the United States. A call from South Korea to the States cost a little over a dollar a minute.

GIs often placed their calls in cold phone booths with a waiting line outside. But they were grateful for the technology of international phones.

Now, we have email for instant written communication and Skype. With Skype, fathers and mothers on active duty away from home can see and talk to their children live from posts anywhere in the world.

Service personnel can even further their education online.

Using Technology, Hyundai Surprises Some Troops with Super Bowl Family Time

Hyundai and the Defense Department worked together to throw a Super Bowl party for soldiers stationed on a military base in Zagan, Poland. These soldiers were part of the recent deployment in early January 2017. The party included big-screen TVs and lots of food.

Three service members were selected to watch the Super Bowl in individual 360-degree immersive TV pods. The concept was to make them feel as if they were sitting in Hyundai’s luxury box at the Super Bowl.

Like many maneuvers in the military, secrecy was involved. A news embargo prevented the media from releasing details of the 90-second ad named “Operation Better” until it aired at the conclusion of the game. While the individual soldiers enjoyed the action in the pods, they were surprised to see their families actually at the game in Houston, watching in similar pods.

The technology was similar to virtual reality, but without the need to use virtual reality headsets. The cameras were similar to 360-degree cameras, but the output was transmitted onto large surround screens inside the pods.

Around the holidays, we often see stories of service personnel reuniting with their children and families on a surprise leave home. This time, the event became a technological reunion because it was the families who popped up in the soldiers’ 360-immersion pods.

The real-time ad was rapidly produced and well planned, despite the challenge of maintaining secrecy. It showed amazing coordination and operational planning. The actual surprise “visit” occurred in the first quarter and the filming was edited in the second quarter. The third and fourth quarters were used for obtaining approvals from DoD, the National Football League and Hyundai.

Future Use Is Ripe for 360-Degree Immersive Pods

On-scene immersive training, such as for crime scenes or accidents, allows police and emergency medical technicians to learn by observing a situation remotely. EMT trainees, for example, can learn without interfering in a life-threatening situation. Police trainees can observe a crime scene without disturbing evidence.

The military could use immersive pods to train patrols to be alert before an incident happens and to identify activities that hinder their ability to operate effectively. These pods could train a soldier to identify indicators of a bomb planted in the ground or an ambush. The advantage is that no one gets hurt in the pods.

This new technology for communicating means that distance is no longer a problem. For situations where details are critical, the 360-degree cameras give investigative researchers a level of detail which has never been seen before.

What Technology Will Be Available in the Future?

“Operation Better” displayed an excellent use of emerging technology in new ways. It also gave corporate America the opportunity to show its appreciation for our military by showcasing ground-breaking technology. As technology continues to improve, our lives – both civilian and military – may see some amazing innovations.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea, supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba, in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea,” and a new book in 2017 Secrets to Getting a Federal Government Job.

What to Do during the Federal Hiring Freeze

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “What to Do during the Federal Hiring Freeze”, In Cyber Defense, 7 Feb. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/federal-hiring-freeze/

Commentary by James Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for
 In Cyber Defense and Contributor, In Homeland Security

Now that President Trump has instituted a 90-day federal hiring freeze, it’s time to study the government hiring situation and improve your application. It’s time to reassess your strategy for getting a federal job and to determine if you are serious about working for the federal government.

When the hiring freeze is lifted, it’s likely that new legislation will restrict managers to hiring just one person for every two vacancies in their office. This will increase the competition and make it more difficult to get hired for a federal job.

The Manager’s View of a Hiring Freeze

It’s smart to look at federal job vacancies from a hiring manager’s point of view. After the freeze ends, I know from personal experience (as a hiring manager during the freeze of 2012-13), that managers will be eager to hire. They need employees to fulfill their agency’s mission.

Until a vacancy is filled, current employees must share the work of the vacant position. Currently, it takes at least six months from the time a hiring process begins to actually bringing a new hire onboard.

When the new employee arrives and assumes his duties, the existing staff is better able to focus on their own jobs. Overall efficiency improves and work is completed in less time than during the freeze.

It is important to remember that the hiring freeze is only for 90 days. Specific exemptions permit some federal agencies to continue to hire during the freeze.

Exceptions to the Federal Hiring Freeze

Experienced federal professionals know that every rule and regulation has exceptions. Paragraph 3 of the January 31 Memorandum: Federal Civilian Hiring Freeze Guidance from the White House lists the following hiring exceptions:

3g. Federal civilian personnel hires are made by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) and the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

3h. Appointments made under the Pathways Internship and Presidential Management Fellows programs (this does not include the Recent Graduates program). Agencies should ensure that such hires understand the provisional nature of these appointments and that conversion [to full-time employment] is not guaranteed.

3i. Conversions in the ordinary course to the competitive service of current agency employees serving in positions with conversion authority, such as Veteran’s Recruitment Act (VRA) and Pathways programs.

3r. The head of any agency may exempt any positions that it deems necessary to: Meet national security (including foreign relations) responsibilities, or public safety responsibilities (including essential activities to the extent that they protect life and property).

Cybersecurity Field Fulfills Critical Needs and Has Many Exemptions

Many cybersecurity jobs are in intelligence organizations, so those jobs are considered essential to the protection of health and safety. (Think hospital records at military facilities and the Department of Veterans Affairs.) Similarly, cyber defense jobs support foreign affairs organizations and are deemed essential to meeting national security responsibilities.

Opportunities Exist in Cybersecurity Despite Hiring Freeze

Despite President Trump’s executive order, there are still opportunities available for cyber defenders. Cyber organizations are hiring employees fresh out of college as well as service veterans.

So don’t be discouraged; the future of the federal civil service is not as bleak as media sources describe. In fact, some job seekers might think it’s more difficult now to obtain a federal job, so there could be fewer applicants and thus less competition.

Be persistent. Keep focused on your career goals and your readiness to meet the challenges of the job you seek.

About the Author

 James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” a book in 2016, “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea,” and a book in 2017, “Secrets to Getting a Federal Government Job.

The Evolution of the CIA’s Area 51

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “The Evolution of the CIA’s Area 51”, In Cyber Defense, 4 Feb. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/evolution-cias-area-51/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for 
In Cyber Defense & Contributor, In Homeland Security

In Cyber Defense many people believe we are the first to worry about secrecy and tool development.  In the past, this was also an issue for defenders of America. This is a story of 1950-1980 technology development. Amazingly, they had some of the same issues, as cyber defenders today. Loss of technology can have drastic consequences.

On 27 January, a Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) retiree gave a briefing that started with a declassified slide marked Top Secret/Sensitive Compartmented Information (TS/SCI).  That is a world-class attention gainer for an audience of many people who had seen it before in proper locations.

This is the first Distinguished Lecture of the 2017 year at the National Atomic Testing Museum in Las Vegas, Nevada.  Mr. Thornton D. Barnes, author and veteran intelligence operative, gave a talk about “The Evolution of the CIA’s Area 51.”

The National Atomic Testing Museum is a national science, history and educational institution that tells the story of America’s nuclear weapons testing program at the Nevada Test Site and beyond. From Atomic Age culture to scientific and technological advances during the latter part of the 20th Century, the museum uses lessons of the past and present to better understand the extent and effect of nuclear testing on worldwide nuclear deterrence and geo-political history.

Mr. Barnes is the president of Roadrunners Internationale, the group of pilots that tested advanced military aircraft at Area 51, and the former executive director of the Nevada Aerospace Hall of Fame. Between projects at Groom Lake, Barnes worked on NASA’s Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA) at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station on the Nevada Test Site. Barnes also participated in Atomic Energy Commission tests of the atomic bomb. He is the author of several books, including “MiGs Over Nevada” which was approved by the CIA Public Relations Branch.

The Solution to No USAF Unarmed Aircraft – CIA

Mr. Barnes started his talk by referencing the CIA Directorate of Science and Technology History manual. He did discuss the history of how the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) evolved into the CIA. In 1950, it was found the USAF General LeMay was not interested in any unarmed aircraft at the same time Lockeed had developed high-flying reconnaissance aircraft. The CIA had been flying Air American, Inc in covert operations. The CIA became the natural choice to conduct the testing for high-flying reconnaissance aircraft.

Why Nevada for CIA Aircraft Testing Site

In 1950, Nevada had a population of 237,000 residents, and most were involved in wartime work with the military, NASA and the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). Nevada had long been known as a military friendly state and the belief was the no one would notice yet another war activity. This is why the CIA chose Area 51 in Nevada to conduct flight testing for the U-2.

CIA created Area 51 facility and combined its air space with the adjoining US Air Force Nellis AFB gunnery range, creating the largest contiguous air and ground range. Groom Lake facility was announced by AEC that the construction would be for NASA weather research. The reality was that CIA would conduct flight test on a reconnaissance plane that was more highly classified than the Manhattan Project that developed the atomic bomb. This was done in the era where military secrecy was understood, respected, and valued.

The Commute to Work

The area was a rough undeveloped desert facility. The employees would fly in on Monday and fly home on Friday.  This was done via their own commuter flight program called Janet Airlines.  It was named after the wife of one of the early leaders of the facilities.  Secrecy was important.  They had mobile home trailers for years until temporary wood buildings, and later permanent housing was built.

The Special Projects team members were known by simple code names easy for customers to remember and to protect identity of Area 51 workers. Mr. T.D. Barnes was “Thunder.” Everything was focused on security and Operations Security or OPSEC.  The CIA Special Projects team was composed of many engineers with different specialties. They were often loaned out to other agencies, with most of them coming to Nevada Area 51. While it could be AEC, or a branch of the military, they were always called the customer for security reasons.

There were many stories of reverse engineering the Soviet Tall King Radar to use it to determine how US reconnaissance planes would appear on Soviet radar.  Stories about the various MIG-17 and MIG-21 flying to show US pilots would they would be up against in combat. Mr. Barnes had stories about the first stealth plane A-12 Blackbird and how the Special Projects team would evaluated it.  The US keeps track of the Soviet satellites.  They would move the test planes, U-2s and Stealth planes into hangers to protect against the Soviet eyes.

Successes, there were many

  • U-2 Projects Aquatone/Idealist overflew reconnaissance over Russia
  • A-12 Project OXCART developed America’s first stealth plane
  • A-12 Operation BLACKSHIELD located missiles sites in North Vietnam and located the USS Pueblo seized by North Korea
  • Projects Tagboard and Senior Bowl produced drone technology
  • MIG-21 exploitation Project HAVE DOUGHNUT revealed the reasons for US air combat losses in North Vietnam and sparked the US Navy to initiate the Top Gun Weapons School
  • MiG-17 exploitation Projects HAVE DRILL and HAVE FERRY further revealed the reasons for US air combat losses in North Korea and sparked the US Air Force to initiate the Red Flag Exercises and added aggressors to the Weapons School.
  • Project HAVE BLUE produced the F-117 Stealth plane.

The top success was the CIA produced the fastest and highest flying manned jet plane ever. The most amazing part was that they kept it secret from our enemies.

Space Aliens

It is funny how many people in America will talk about space aliens being hidden at Area 51.  The truth is that there were “UFOs” at Area 51.  They were the U-2, SR-71, A-12, D-21 drone, and other strange shaped airplanes for high altitude flight. The pilots had to wear pressurized suits which made them look strange in the 1960s. The mission was secret. In all of the stories, Area 51 was a success because the CIA developed stealth technology, evaluated proof of concepts, exploited our enemy’s technology, and flew reconnaissance flights over denied territory.  Overall, Area 51 was a highly successful area that promoted American defense. Today’s Cyber Defenders could learn from the past.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded the 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” a book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea,” and Secrets to Getting a Federal Government Job.

Giuliani Appointment Puts Administration Spotlight on Cybersecurity

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “Giuliani Appointment Puts Administration Spotlight on Cybersecurity”, In Cyber Defense, 20 Jan. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/giuliani-appointment-cybersecurity/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Contributor, In Homeland Security

Donald Trump announced last week that former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani will be advising the new administration on cybersecurity issues.

Giuliani will head an advisory group from the corporate world because of his “long and very successful government career in law enforcement, and his now sixteen years of work providing security solutions in the private sector,” according to a statement by the Trump transition website.

Trump will host “a series of meetings with senior corporate executives from companies which have faced or are facing challenges similar to those facing the government and public entities today, such as hacking, intrusions, disruptions, manipulations, theft of data and identities, and securing information technology infrastructure,” the GreatAgain.gov website explains.

The goal is to improve the planning and implementation for increasing security of computer systems by drawing on the knowledge and input of corporate leaders. Cybersecurity has become a key issue for Trump, since U.S. intelligence agencies blamed Russia for recent hacking attacks during the U.S. presidential election campaign.

New Cybersecurity Initiative Using Several Avenues to Share Information

The Department of Homeland Security has several avenues to share information with public corporations. Executive Order 13691, Promoting Private Sector Cybersecurity Information Sharing directs DHS to engage “in continuous, collaborative, and inclusive coordination” with information sharing and analysis organizations (ISAOs) via the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC). The NCCIC coordinates cybersecurity information sharing and analysis among the federal government and private-sector partners.

These organizations were created for each of the 16 critical infrastructure sectors. The information technology sector has many government and private sector participants. It appears this new initiative aims to get corporate executives to participate and solve cyber security problems.

What Will Giuliani’s Role Be?

Giuliani’s role in this new cybersecurity initiative is not clear. For example, what will his official position be and how will he interact with DHS? The DHS Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C) is part of the National Protection and Programs Directorate. Will Giuliani coordinate with the CS&C? Or will he plan for or give direction to the office?

The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has broad knowledge of and experience with federal computer systems. The Defense Department is required to report an incident to US-CERT within 12 hours. Public-sector organizations can voluntarily report incidents to US-CERT.

Will Giuliani receive briefings from US-CERT? Will he have the reports filtered via CS&C?

The bottom line is that the new administration sees the value of and need for improved cybersecurity. It appears to be a growing business. It will also be an area for improved employment prospects.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”

New Phishing Technique Puts Gmail Accounts at Risk

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “New Phishing Technique Puts Gmail Accounts at Risk”, In Cyber Defense, 17 Jan. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/phishing-technique-gmail-accounts-risk/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for
In Cyber Defense

Cyber attackers have found a new, highly effective phishing technique targeting Gmail and other services, according to a recent article on Wordfence.

Author Mark Maunder writes “an attacker will send an email to your Gmail account. That email may come from someone you know who has had their account hacked using this technique. It may also include something that looks like an image of an attachment you recognize from the sender.

You click on the image, expecting Gmail to give you a preview of the attachment. Instead, a new tab opens up and you are prompted by Gmail to sign in again….Once you complete sign-in, your account has been compromised.”

Maunder surmises that the attackers must be on hand and ready to exploit your account because of the speed with which they respond. They sign into your account and send emails with your attachments using your subject lines from previous emails to people in your address book.

This is a very effective phishing technique to use against the people who trust you. The hacking crew is large enough to spread across several time zones and exploit your English-language email account. More analysis of this phishing technique might reveal what other languages are being used for this phishing method and help locate the attackers by their unique skill sets.

Using Gmail Single Sign-On Services Is Risky for Your Account

The comfort of Single Sign-On services for your Gmail credentials creates a security risk for your account. As we get more comfortable using these services and customers ask for more ease of operation, we will have to consider the impact of risk that comes with the ease of operation.

The Wordfence article shows a “data URI” (Uniform Resource Identifier) with the complete file in the browser location bar. This data URI provides a method to include in-line data in web pages as if they were normal external resources.

The data:text link line in the browser bar is actually a disguised script. This script opens a fake Gmail login page. When you log in, it sends your real credentials to an attacker. Ideally, you should review the whole browser address window and ensure there is not a script hiding further inside the window.

Always Check Your Browser’s Location Bar

The Wordfence article, US-CERT best practices and other experts say it is best to check the location bar in your browser to determine if you are clicking on the correct website. Just because you click on something that states: “We will make you rich, click link” does not mean it is the correct link.

In fact, here is a safe example. Click on this link: “We will make you rich.

The link will NOT make you rich, but it sends you to the US-CERT Best Practices Page. Be sure to check your links before you click on them to see whether they match.

A reader comment from Google suggests that most any HTTP or HTTPS could have phishing code. The reader says the address bar in a browser window remains one of the few trustworthy components in a browser program.

To say that the browser address bar is highly trusted is inviting the next skilled hacker to show his capability. We do not know what the future will hold in terms of security and hacker attackers. However, I would not bet on the safety of any material you wish to keep private.

It is wiser to remain up to date with your security software and to study new cyberattacks when you hear about them to keep your computers and mobile devices protected.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”

Managing Multiple Generations: Issues, Problems and Language

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “Managing Multiple Generations: Issues, Problems and Language”, In Cyber Defense, 24 Jan. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/managing-multiple-generations/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for 
In Cyber Defense and Contributor, In Homeland Security

In the world of cyber defenders, we often see multiple generations working in the same office. We see the Millennials, GenXers and Baby Boomers who have seniority and management skills. However, has the world changed when it comes to managing a multiple-generation organization?

Dan Coates is an authority on marketing and research about youth and the millennial market. At the recent 2017 SHOT Show’s Executive Management Seminar, he discussed how various generations view management.

His ideas can help improve management skills in many areas. The need for better management is critical as the government tries to hire more cyber security personnel.

What Makes Generations Unique?

Coates looked at what makes the generations unique. What made Millennials unique was technology. It was their top concern, twice as important as that of Gen Xers. Millennials want IT upgrades and better hardware and software.

Boomers rated the work ethic as the number one concern among those factors that made their generation unique. After all, who are today’s managers?

Coates’ research found Millennials’ second top focus was music and culture. For Gen Xers, it was work ethics, while Boomers cited respect.

With this diversity of focus among different generations, there is the potential for workplace issues. That focus could cause Millennials to perceive older workers as too much like “stuffed shirts,” while Millennials are seen as undisciplined by Gen Xers and Baby Boomers.

Managers should give consideration to each generation’s unique qualities as they deal with different generations in the workplace. Training and managing expectations might calm workplace issues before they become problems that interfere with productivity.

Each Generation Has Its Own World Views

Coates explained that each generation has a unique experience and point of view. Their generational characteristics shape the way they view the world.

To effectively communicate with employees, managers should consider the generation they address. Thinking of generation communications as three different languages could help improve workplace communication.

Tips for Working with Generation Xers

  • Show how the discourse affects them. What is the impact on them?
  • Focus on skills development. Explain how they can develop and grow.
  • Show proof of what you’re discussing. Give examples of improvements that can be made and provide websites.
  • Keep it concise. Make the bottom line simple, straightforward and to the point.

Tips for Working with Millennials

  • Emphasize “the cause” first; they want to make an impact on the world. The military calls this “mission focus.”
  • Be highly visual. Millennials are a visually driven group and prefer images over text.
  • Think online and offline. Digital natives need digital points in addition to in-person reinforcement, because they live online and offline simultaneously.
  • Use peer influence. Give examples of peer successes.

Examine the Possible Solutions

Many of these tips and comments have been raised in executive management seminars and MBA courses, but Dan Coates separates them into generational targeting. If your office is having personnel issues, check to see if they are multi-generational in nature and try some of these tips. The solution of workplace problems may lie in dissecting the players by generation and looking for the solution as a targeted segment.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba, in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”

New Medical Technology and Data Privacy

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “New Medical Technology and Data Privacy”, In Cyber Defense, 18 Jan. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/new-medical-technology-data-privacy/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Senior Editor for
In Cyber Defense

As we grow older, we should be thankful for the growth of medical technology. New devices on the market expand healthcare providers’ capability to treat patients. These new products range from insulin pumps and home safety equipment to blood pressure rings.

Airbags for Humans

At the CES show in 2017, ActiveProtective debuted an innovative belt with built-in airbags that deploy when the belt detects that the wearer is falling. The concept is similar to a car airbag by providing protection before impact and preventing injury. This airbag product is especially useful for hip replacement patients.

However, there might be data privacy issues with this product later. The company plans to increase the belt’s communication ability as time goes on. In the future, the belt may include the option to send information via email to doctors or other caregivers using a Wi-Fi/Bluetooth system or cellular phone.

Should Other Fall Devices Communicate Private Data?

All medical device users face the conundrum of deciding whether privacy or immediate treatment of an injury is more important. For instance, many fall monitoring devices on the market immediately communicate to other people when the wearer falls. Other monitoring devices, such as Life Alert, require the patient to press a button and call for help. Both types of monitoring devices are helpful, but again there are privacy concerns.

Often, a patient’s primary focus is on immediate treatment and health recovery. The patient would rather call an ambulance than worry about privacy invasions from patient data these devices might transmit.

While these monitoring devices may only send alert information regarding someone’s fall-related injuries, this information may not be encrypted. This lack of security becomes a worrisome issue if a thief is scanning radio waves or wardriving in order to find Wi-Fi networks.

With the alert message sent from someone’s home, a criminal may intercept the message and attempt a home invasion before first responders can arrive. Both versions of an alert compromised in transmission could invite someone to empty your home of valuables.

Cybersecurity Experts Are Critical for Solving Privacy Issues

It will be up to cyber defenders to think of these privacy issues and provide solutions. The problems are not easy. There needs to be a way to securely transmit private health information without the fear of a garbled message and without using encryption that renders an emergency message unreadable by the patient’s family or friends.

If radio transmissions are used to communicate health data, a device’s ability to transmit information could be limited due to the use of powerful encryption in hand-held radios. However, a patient in pain would be more interested in making contact with first responders than about risks to data security.

Inside a hospital, it’s easier to control data signals and encryption due to HIPAA regulations. However, people who are at home with chronic medical problems will need more careful monitoring. The criticality of quality medical information given to medical personnel will become an issue of data protection as the field of medical equipment continues to evolve.

Do Medical Devices Have Potential for Security Attacks?

After Vice President Dick Cheney received a pacemaker, he and the U.S. Secret Service worried about the potential for assassination via a hacked pacemaker. There have not been any reports of assassination by medical device…yet.

Security researchers have explored a few specific devices to improve multiple devices that communicate medical information.

New medical devices are being developed regularly. Over time, confidence in health monitoring technology will increase in importance. So with today’s advances in technology, it’s a better time to be a patient than ever before.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba, in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”

OPSEC Precautions For This Site

Source: http://news.nationalpost.com/arts/movies/jason-bourne-proves-why-computers-are-the-worst-thing-to-happen-to-the-spy-thriller-since-no-more-day-to-day-formalwear

Things to keep in mind when interacting with The Lint Center, particularly when leaving comments or uploading photos:

  1. Defense conditions are classified secret, while force protection conditions are unclassified.
  2. Vulnerability of oconus installations to sabotage or penetration is classified secret if U.S. Intelligence information is made.
  3. The identity of units planned for deployment is confidential until an official announcement of the deployment is made.
  4. General geographic location of units deployed ( I.E. City, Country or Area) is unclassified.
  5. Specific geographic location of units deployed is confidential.
  6. Details of allied military participation in operations are secret.

The Global reach of the World Wide Web requires special precautions to be taken when posting information. The following types of information will not be posted publicly on WarriorLodge.com and will be taken down immediately:

  • Information that is for official use only (FOUO). This type of information would pose an unacceptable risk to the US Military, especially in electronically aggregated form. While records containing FOUO information will normally be marked at the time of their creation, records that do not bare such markings shall be assumed to contain FOUO information.
  • Analysis and recommendations concerning lessons learned which would reveal sensitive military operations, exercises or vulnerabilities.
  • Reference to unclassified information that would reveal sensitive movements of military assets or the location of units, installations, or personnel where uncertainty regarding location is an element of a military plan or program.
  • Personal information including compilations of names or personnel assigned overseas, sensitive, or routinely deployable units.
  • Names, locations, and specific identifying information about family members of military and government employees.
  • Highly technical information that can be used or be adapted for use to design, engineer, product, manufacture, operate, repair, overhaul, or reproduce any military or space equipment or technology concerning such equipment.
  • Unclassified information pertaining to classified programs. The clearance review procedures for unclassified information pertaining to classified programs proposed for posting to a publicly accessible web sites must take into account the likelihoods of classification compilation.

So, let’s review…

  1. Don’t discuss current or future deployment destinations.
  2. Don’t discuss current or future operations or missions.
  3. Don’t discuss current or future dates and times of when service members will be in deployed, in-port or conducting exercises.
  4. Don’t discuss readiness issues and numbers.
  5. Don’t discuss specific training equipment.
  6. Don’t discuss people’s names and billets in conjunction with operations.
  7. Don’t speculate about current or future operations.
  8. Don’t spread rumors about current, future, or past operations or movements.
  9. Don’t assume the enemy is not trying to collect information on you; they are… right now.  Seriously.
  10. Be smart, use your head, and always think OPSEC when using email, phone, chat rooms and message boards.

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Operations Security: 1. A systematic, proven process by which a government, organization, or individual can identify, control, and protect generally unclassified information about an operation/activity and, thus, deny or mitigate an adversary’s/competitor’s ability to compromise or interrupt said operation/activity (NSC 1988). 2. OPSEC is a process of identifying critical information and subsequently analyzing friendly actions attendant to military operations and other activities to (a) identify those actions that can be observed by adversary intelligence systems, (b) determine indicators adversary intelligence systems might obtain that could be interpreted or pieced together to derive critical information in time to be useful to adversaries, and select and execute measures that eliminate or reduce to an acceptable level the vulnerabilities of friendly actions to adversary exploitation (DOD JP 1994; JCS 1997).

Operations Security process: An analytical process that involves five components: identification of critical information, analysis of threats, analysis of vulnerabilities, assessment of risks, and application of appropriate countermeasures (NSC 1988).

Source: http://www.ioss.gov/glossary.html#o