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How a Purple Pen Brought Cohesion to the Defense Intelligence Agency

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “How a Purple Pen Brought Cohesion to the Defense Intelligence Agency”, In Military, 21 October 2016, Web, https://inmilitary.com/purple-pen-brought-cohesion-defense-intelligence-agency/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University

Lieutenant General Patrick M. Hughes, Retired, served in multiple capacities in numerous Army and joint commands as senior intelligence officer of the U.S. Central Command (USCENTCOM) before he served as director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. DIA is a Combat Support Agency (CSA) of the Department of Defense.

General Hughes Faced Obstacles with Interservice and Interagency Rivalries

After his appointment, Hughes encountered interservice and interagency rivalry. Inside the DIA, Hughes, led and managed members of the Marine Corps, Air Force, Navy and his own branch of service, the Army. There were also a significant number of U.S. Civil Service civilians who were DIA employees.

Part of Hughes’ role was to orchestrate mission priorities and direct the allocation of National Intelligence Program (NIP) resources, specifically the General Defense Intelligence Program throughout the DoD. Competition for resources created a level of friction that often exceeded the normal, healthy levels that successful organizations need for success.

Hughes’ success depended upon his ability to maintain perspective and common mission priorities. He also needed to achieve a healthy balance between an “organizational” focus and an “enterprise” focus.

Hughes’ Purple Pen Was Lesson in Leadership and Organizational Cohesiveness

The general brought to DIA many years of leadership experience in working with U.S. and foreign intelligence organizations. He had learned long ago how to blend organizations and capabilities for cohesive, high-performing results.

One of his unique ways of showing he was the leader of DIA rather than an Army organization was his use of a purple pen. Purple is a color designation that symbolizes joint organizations. The color purple combines the blue colors of the Air Force, Navy and Coast Guard with the scarlet and gold of the Marine Corps and the green of the Army.

This simple, direct and visual message had a significant impact on DIA employees. By using purple ink, Hughes was demonstrating that he was there to lead a joint organization and would not show parochial favoritism to any specific organization. He was always known for being fair in all discussions.

Hughes continued his tradition for using a purple pen after his retirement from the U.S. Army. Hughes used the purple pen while he was the senior intelligence officer for the Department of Homeland Security. The pen indicated his support for the best decisions and actions in support of the 20-plus DHS organizations and the national intelligence community.

Hughes is famous for his purple pen, which is just one of several techniques he used to drive success and innovation. Because Hughes successfully led organizations during times of turbulence and threat, he is considered one of our strongest leaders.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded their 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence within the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, contractor and civil service.

James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. In 2016 he was accepted as a member of the Military Writers Guild. He has served in the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis and at the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office. James had an active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”

InfraGard: Helping the Nation’s IT Security Professionals

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “InfraGard: Helping the Nation’s IT Security Professionals”, In Homeland Security, 12 Oct. 2016, Web, https://inhomelandsecurity.com/infragard-helps-nations-security/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Contributor, In Homeland Security

On August 25, InfraGard Las Vegas had an interesting event where they discussed a report about current threats to information technology. InfraGard is an organization that serves the security community.

New or old security managers and intelligence professionals may desire to join InfraGard. InfraGard not only provides networking opportunities, but it also helps members to learn current information and threats outside of the normal information flow in organizations.

InfraGard is a non-profit organization and federal information sharing program dedicated to protecting national cybersecurity by sharing information among businesses, academic institutions and law enforcement agencies, including the FBI. In addition to cybersecurity, InfraGard members also review the big picture of security threats, threat movements and the impact of threat actors in areas outside of members’ organizations.

InfraGard was founded by the FBI in 1996 and has more than 80 chapters in the U.S. This organization is led by local industry leaders with support from the local FBI office.

Careful Screening Process Ensures Members Receive Quality Information

Membership in InfraGard is free, but, participants must go through a screening process in order to join this association. Prospective members must be U.S. citizens and work in the security field. For example, they can work in a security company or in the security office of a corporation.

FBI Special Agents often have security briefs during the meetings, so the FBI does a background check (including a criminal history check) on all members to ensure that the sensitive information they provide remains confidential. All members have a requirement to protect information as “business confidential” and not disclose it beyond the intended scope. In turn, federal agencies exercise care to protect sensitive information they receive from InfraGard members.

InfraGard has subcommittees pertaining to 16 critical infrastructure sectors, as defined by President Obama. Protecting these sectors advances a national policy to strengthen and maintain secure, functioning and resilient critical infrastructures. Since most members’ parent organization aligns with one of the sectors, the sector subcommittees are a method for members to learn from their peers in their sector.

InfraGard Membership Encourages Knowledge Development and Growth

Membership into InfraGard also has a web portal used for sharing information. Contributors to the web portal include the FBI and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Information provided by the FBI and DHS is both timely and official, allowing corporate members to gauge threats.

The portal also provides access to many sector publications, allowing security professionals to access information that can be used to protect their own organizations. InfraGard also holds webinars to encourage the professional growth of its members.

InfraGard’s main value comes from the ability to learn and share quality information with other security professionals. InfraGard also allows professionals to give back to the organization by mentoring each other, further encouraging the growth of its members.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded their 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence within the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, contractor and civil service.

James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. In 2016 he was accepted as a member of the Military Writers Guild. He has served in the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis and at the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office. James had an active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”

Giuliani Appointment Puts Administration Spotlight on Cybersecurity

Published with Permission by:
Lint, James R., “Giuliani Appointment Puts Administration Spotlight on Cybersecurity”, In Cyber Defense, 20 Jan. 2017, Web, http://incyberdefense.com/news/giuliani-appointment-cybersecurity/

By James R. Lint
Faculty Member, School of Business, American Military University
Contributor, In Homeland Security

Donald Trump announced last week that former NYC Mayor Rudy Giuliani will be advising the new administration on cybersecurity issues.

Giuliani will head an advisory group from the corporate world because of his “long and very successful government career in law enforcement, and his now sixteen years of work providing security solutions in the private sector,” according to a statement by the Trump transition website.

Trump will host “a series of meetings with senior corporate executives from companies which have faced or are facing challenges similar to those facing the government and public entities today, such as hacking, intrusions, disruptions, manipulations, theft of data and identities, and securing information technology infrastructure,” the GreatAgain.gov website explains.

The goal is to improve the planning and implementation for increasing security of computer systems by drawing on the knowledge and input of corporate leaders. Cybersecurity has become a key issue for Trump, since U.S. intelligence agencies blamed Russia for recent hacking attacks during the U.S. presidential election campaign.

New Cybersecurity Initiative Using Several Avenues to Share Information

The Department of Homeland Security has several avenues to share information with public corporations. Executive Order 13691, Promoting Private Sector Cybersecurity Information Sharing directs DHS to engage “in continuous, collaborative, and inclusive coordination” with information sharing and analysis organizations (ISAOs) via the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center (NCCIC). The NCCIC coordinates cybersecurity information sharing and analysis among the federal government and private-sector partners.

These organizations were created for each of the 16 critical infrastructure sectors. The information technology sector has many government and private sector participants. It appears this new initiative aims to get corporate executives to participate and solve cyber security problems.

What Will Giuliani’s Role Be?

Giuliani’s role in this new cybersecurity initiative is not clear. For example, what will his official position be and how will he interact with DHS? The DHS Office of Cybersecurity and Communications (CS&C) is part of the National Protection and Programs Directorate. Will Giuliani coordinate with the CS&C? Or will he plan for or give direction to the office?

The U.S. Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) has broad knowledge of and experience with federal computer systems. The Defense Department is required to report an incident to US-CERT within 12 hours. Public-sector organizations can voluntarily report incidents to US-CERT.

Will Giuliani receive briefings from US-CERT? Will he have the reports filtered via CS&C?

The bottom line is that the new administration sees the value of and need for improved cybersecurity. It appears to be a growing business. It will also be an area for improved employment prospects.

About the Author

James R. Lint recently retired as the (GG-15) civilian director for intelligence and security, G2, U.S. Army Communications Electronics Command. He is an adjunct professor at AMU. James has been involved in cyberespionage events from just after the turn of the century in South Korea supporting 1st Signal Brigade to the DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis as the first government cyber intelligence analyst. He has 38 years of experience in military intelligence with the U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Army, government contracting and civil service.

Additionally, James started the Lint Center for National Security Studies, a nonprofit charity that recently awarded its 43rd scholarship for national security students and professionals. James was also elected as the 2015 national vice president for the Military Intelligence Corps Association. He has also served in the Department of Energy’s S&S Security Office after his active military career in the Marine Corps for seven years and also served 14 years in the Army. His military assignments include South Korea, Germany and Cuba in addition to numerous CONUS locations. James has authored a book published in 2013, “Leadership and Management Lessons Learned,” and a new book in 2016 “8 Eyes on Korea, A Travel Perspective of Seoul, Korea.”